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Yoroshiku

A student asked me, "How do you say 'Yoroshiku onegaishimasu' in English?" I answered, "There's no such expression in English."

"Yoroshiku onegaishimasu" literally means something like "I humbly ask you to be kind to me", but it has ambiguous yet good connotations. Quite Japanese, but this phrase implies your respect and politeness to the people you meet, your good will and determination. It is frequently used when meeting people for the first time, or joining a group. When you are introduced to a person/persons, and say "Yoroshiku onegaishimasu", it can be "Nice to meet you." If you entered my school (wow) and said so, it could be "I'll do my best, so please give me good teaching." To a new business partner, it means "Looking forward to doing business with you." Depending on the situations, it could mean "Please remember me," "Please take care of it," "I'll leave it to you," "Hope we can get along well," "You'll be sorry,"(?)... "Please say yoroshiku to Jim." is "Please say hello to Jim." ("Yoroshiku" only is a more casual form.) Don't you think it's a very convenient expression? Ambiguity is often the name of the game in Japan. And that could come as a difficulty in learning English.

So, to my dear visitors out there, "Hi, I'm Kiyo. Yoroshiku!"

Comments

quote:
"Ambiguity is often the name of the game in Japan. And that could come as a difficulty in learning English."

And of course, you can also say that it can come as a difficulty for Americans like myself learning Japanese. While we do have our own ambiguous phrases and ways of saying things, our general demeanor is to come right our and say what we're thinking, and not to "beat around the bush" as we say. It's difficult sometimes for us to learn all the polite Japanese expressions and forms of speech (like the "masu" form, for example) because we don't really have the equivalent form of language in English (American English that is).

"Beating around the bush" way of communication has been a kind of art here, but actually it's sometimes annoying and inefficient. This may gradually change with the times.

And as for the polite forms of speech, it seems more and more younger generations can't use them properly.

That's is so cool to learn! Thanks for shareing and expressing yourself so well:)

Kiyo, is "Dozo yorishiku" different in any way to "Yoroshiku Onegaishimasu"?

My pleasure, Lady Phoxxe. :)

Darren, "Dozo" adds a little intensity and politeness to "Yoroshiku", but it still sounds informal because no polite form is added after "Yoroshiku". Thus, "Yoroshiku onegaishimasu" is much more polite, and will be a safe choice. You can also say "Dozo yoroshiku onegaishimasu."

Personally, I'd say "Yoroshiku" rather than "Dozo yoroshiku." It's a matter of taste.

kiyo, on your point about things changing, saw a tv program segment about these "kogal" girls who couldn't speak proper polite Japanese because they're so used to speaking their own keitai-influenced lingo. A couple were even in college! It's an interesting thing, that word processors (and now personal computers) are making it so that a lot of younger people have difficulty writing good-looking kanji, and now keitais are helping to bring down the language. The negative aspect of changing times in Japan.

interesting!! what other phrases (preferably polite ones) exist in japanese that are as fascinating as this one?

Thanks for having an interest in this post, Ninigi-no-Mikoto (hey, great name). Well, there is "suimasen". It means "Sorry," "Excuse me," and "Thank you." :)

I must wish you domo arigato gozaimas for this post. It's helped me to understand the Japanese language a little more. :D

Dear Kiyo,

Yoroshiku Onegaishimasu! My name is Unchalee and this is the first time I'm here. Actually, I was sort of lost in the middle of nowhere before stopping by at your site. My customer said "Yoroshiku Onegaishimasu" to me but I wasn't aware of its meaning at all. Now, I got it, thanks to you.

Anyway, I'm curious if I am to express my politeness to him/her, shall I say the same phrase to him/her too? If you have any better phrase for me to greet them back, please let me know! I'd be very glad to know that.

Thanks again,
Amy

Hi, Exitium and Amy. Thanks for thanking me for the entry. I'm glad.

Amy, as a greeting, you can say "Kochira koso," which means like "Same here," or "Kochira koso yoroshiku onegaishimasu."


Yoroshiku Onegaishimasu

how do you write in japanese:

hello
bye
thanks
regards
keep in touch

please refer me to a webpage, if any

Jim,

Might want to check out babelfish.altavista.com They provide translation for your basic words. Sentences, especially in Japanese, tend to be off though so use with a bit of caution...

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Kiyosama, good explanation of Yoroshiku. I am a sansei, and sometimes forget my Nihongo, because I don't use it very much. Twenty years or so ago, I was able to pass for Nihonjin in Nihon for at least 5 or 10 minutes. Now, because it has been so long since I was last there, I cannot speak so fluently. I try, however, to use it whenever possible. But, I need to refresh my memory sometimes, and it helps to find sites like yours to aid me. I believe I have a few other explanations for "Yoroshiku, onegaishimasu": pleased to meet you, (essentially the same as "nice...."; and well; properly; suitably; best regards; please remember me; or if someone offers something, I have heard yoroshiku used to mean something like: please take this, you are welcome to this, or it is my pleasure to offer this, and then then the receiver who uses yoroshiku means: it is my pleasure to accept this, I am honored to accept this, and so on... I have also heard people say, for instance, when a shopkeeper welcomes a customer, Irashai! yoroshiku, onegaishimasu, generally meaning: "welcome, we are pleased or honored to serve you, in addition to other "niceities." Am I correct? I have found there are many words in Nihongo that are difficult to translate accurately, because Ego either doesn't have a comparable word or phrase, or because the word in Nihongo changes meaning and has so many nuances, depending upon situations, and can mean so many things that Americajin have problems applying and understanding the different uses. One last thing... Since I learned most of my Nihongo from my parents, I have been told that I speak old-fashioned Nihongo, because it is "TOO polite." And, I agree that so many young people have become too Westernized, and have forgotten the beauty of the social graces expressed in the language. Mottainai fukenshiki desho?

Hajime Mashite.

Watashi wa Toma Marika desu.

Dozo Yoroshiku Onegaishimasu.


Menger, I don't want to sound offensive but you should not call yourself a sensei it's not proper. You should call yourself kyouyu when presenting yourself, and people as a mark of respect will call you sensei. :)

Dozo Yoroshiku Onegaishimasu.

I want to say (past tense because I'm sending a card to some in Tokyo from the US) "it was very nice to meet you" - can someone give me a translation for this?
Thanks

Dear Marika, y're baka.

When you see these “A, B, C, D, E, F, G...", you should slow down and read more carefully,
"Sansei" is not same as "Sensei"


"The Sansei Japanese Americans (三世 lit. third generation) are American-born Japanese Americans citizens of the United States, the children of the Nisei Japanese Americans. Serving from 1999 to 2003, Army General Eric Shinseki of Hawaii became the first Asian American military chief of staff. ... The Nisei Japanese Americans (二世 pronounced Nee-say, lit. ...

Most Sansei were born during the Baby Boom after the end of World War II. Older Sansei who were living in the western United States during WWII were forcibly interned with their parents and grandparents (Issei Japanese Americans) after the issuance of Executive Order 9066. A baby boom is any period of greatly increased birth rate within temporal and usually geographical bounds. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Jerome Relocation Camp The Japanese American internment refers to the exclusion and subsequent removal of approximately 112,000 to 120,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans, officially described as persons of Japanese ancestry, 62% of whom were United States citizens, from the west coast of the United States during World War... The Issei Japanese Americans (一世 lit. ... United States Executive Order 9066 was signed into law on February 19, 1942 (during World War II), by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, using his authority as Commander-in-Chief to exercise war powers. ...

The Sansei played a leading activist role in a redress movement, which culminated in a bill signed by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 which provided an official apology and $20,000 restitution for each of the 60,000 survivors (about half of the total internees). Order: 40th President Vice President: George H.W. Bush Term of office: January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Bel-Air... 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... "

Yoroshiku Onegaishimasu.

I have read all the above meanings and need some help. An elderly former business colleague has e mailed me twice requesting that i meet with him - he is flying in from tokyo for the second time in two weeks. I could not meet him last time as I was travelling. The second mail today also has me out of my home country when he arrives. Both e mails are titled "Yoroshiko". He is a very traditional elderly Japanese man who I have assisted a few times. Should I cancel my plan and return to meet with him?

Would greatly appreciate your thoughts as I do worry about him

no wonder i still cant master japanese after watching anime for almost 2 years... onli stuff i know is sumthing like "kimochi", "motto, motto", "yamete kudasai!!!"
hmmmm, ah well... at least i have sum form of understanding...

My boss say "yoroshiku" to me this morning after I finish 1 good job . What does he mean ?

Yeah, I'm gosei, and I was quite offended when someone assumed, in their own ignorance, that that "sansei" was "sensei." Please read more carefully. Reading like that in Japan would not end well.

Great blog! Your explanation is really clear and thorough! Do you mind if I link to your page?

Nice to meet you!

No problem, Robert. Though I haven't blogged regularly recently, a comment like this can make me want to blog again. :) Thanks.

And, hey guys, thanks for leaving messages while I was away. ;)

Excellent explanation of 'yoroshiku onegaishimasu.' To complicate things, here are a series of ways to say the same thing from very casual to EXTREMELY formal:

yoroshiku
yoroshiku onegaishimasu (most common)
dozo yoroshiku onegaishimasu
dozo yoroshiku onegai itashimasu
dozo yoroshiku onegai moushiagemasu

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Thank you for this explanation ^^ some friends of mine asked me to introduce myself in japanese to show them how it was done and at the end of saying my name and whatnot, I blurted out "yoroshiku onegaishimasu" and I thought HUH I'm not even sure what that means 0.0 where did I learn to say That? lol it just flew out automatically and I rly had no idea where it come from. So I was worried that I said some kind of nonsense but now I know it was correct ^^ maybe I'd just heard it a lot and it stuck in my mind without me knowing.

and to chris steward.. watching anime for 2yrs is nothing. If you rly want to master your japanese, go to classes and study hard! the watching anime part will just be a helping hand. I am starting classes later this year ^^ as soon as I save enough money to afford them.

Thank you for this explanation ^^ some friends of mine asked me to introduce myself in japanese to show them how it was done and at the end of saying my name and whatnot, I blurted out "yoroshiku onegaishimasu" and I thought HUH I'm not even sure what that means 0.0 where did I learn to say That? lol it just flew out automatically and I rly had no idea where it come from. So I was worried that I said some kind of nonsense but now I know it was correct ^^ maybe I'd just heard it a lot and it stuck in my mind without me knowing.

and to chris steward.. watching anime for 2yrs is nothing. If you rly want to master your japanese, go to classes and study hard! the watching anime part will just be a helping hand. I am starting classes later this year ^^ as soon as I save enough money to afford them.

hey i understand now...buthow to reply when a person said "Yoroshiku onegaishimasu"?

How to say in nihongo "i'm thinking of you right now, take care"

Hajime Mashite.
Watashi wa Skye-chan....

Yoroshiku! Your site has helped me very greatly to understand Japanese. I was having trouble understanding my Japanese homework, and now I understand it that much more. I am sure to visit back each and every time I am having trouble. Sayonara!

(did I do that right? ^^)

Watashi wa Rendy desu. Yoroshiku onegai shimasu!

Kiyo-sama,thanks for the great detail on the explantion on Yoroshiku.
Lets keep this alive =)
Arigatou gozaimasu!


bokuwa yuuki desu

yoroshiku onegaishimasu

nihongo shogakusha desuka bokutachi, kitto

did i get that rite?
and btw, yuuki doesnt mean snow. It means courage and yuki means snow(for those of you who thought otherwise)

and another thing when addressing oneself, don't add honourifics behind ur name as in "watashiwa xxx-san" it will seem very childish and rude(to the traditional japanese though)

umm deathcoy, what genres of anime are u actually watching? it seems tt the phrase "kimochi" is really ... eechi or hentai in this case. WAtching those anime wont help lols.
Ive been watching animes tt are of the mystery and rmance genre.^.^

btw i cant differenciate the different kanji characters>.


Yoroshiku onegaishimasu ^_^
watashi wa chiaki desu.....

im a half japanese my otosang is a japanese ....
so when i talk 2 him i always speak in jap but im not good in speaking of it so my okasang translate it 2 me or 2 my otosang
when i first heard this Yoroshiku onegaishimasu from my otosang tomodashi
he say it ...BUT I DONT GET IT...
BUT SO ON and now i get it thankz 2 u kiyo sama...

ARIGATO GOZAIMASHITA KIYO SAMA ^_^...

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