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Night Fever

It's Sunday. Time flies. So it's time for Sunday Special, eh? OK, let's enjoy Sozaiya Tyon's wonderful web graphics this time again!

noren

This cloth is called Noren, a kind of doorway curtain. Here in Japan, you can see noren hung at the entrance of stores and restaurants. Noren indicate the business is open or they are offering some specialties within. On the noren of this image is a kanji character "kori" (ice). Do you have any idea what specialty it shows? It's kakigori, shaved ice flavored with syrup. kakigori A typical summer treat. Don't eat it in haste, or you'll have a headache!

take

Bamboos. A bamboo forest is a usual scene in Japan. So, this image gives off an air of Japan-ness. However, there is no bamboo forest in Hokkaido! This fact well explains the northern-ness here. When I saw a bamboo forest for the first time, I felt like I was in a foreign country.

disco

Nothing to do with things Japanese? Right. This image reminds me of my college days. Do you know or remember the film "Saturday Night Fever"? I think it was released in late '70s. The fever came to Japan as well and it brought disco dancing into fashion. Even the word "fever" got to be on everybody's lips, in the Japanese way of course, and "Fiibaa (fever) suru" became a key word for having any fun together. If you want to be uncool now, say "Fiibaa shiyo!" (Let's have a fiibaa). It's perfect.

Comments

The headache you mentioned from the shaved ice treat is commonly referred to as "Brain-Freeze" in Canada, and I think the US. I think it was a marketing slogan for 7-Eleven.

Thanks for giving me a new word, TheRich. So they coined the expression? 7-11 Japan's commercial song goes, "Sebun (7), irebun (11), ii kibun (feeling good). :)

I remember, as a kid in Texas, hearing the old ad campaign whose slogan was, "Oh, thank heaven for 7/11!" They had what was called a Slurpee, which was a snowcone. There are still 7/11s around here, but also, much more common are White Hens. Somewhat less common are the Convenients. You know, despite all the kitsch associated with convenience stores, I still like them, especially when you're out alone, far from home, at maybe 2am.

MNW

I've heard the 7-11 "thank heaven" bit a few times as well.
Kiyo, I have a pronunciation question for you. How is "ii" pronounced? I'm curious. :)

MNW, convenience stores are around in a small town like here. Yeah, I like them.

TheRich, "ii" is pronounced like the "ee" in "eek". Actually, we say the sound twice very quickly. Its meaning is "good". Ii question! ;)

Not so dissimilar from "Ha-wai-i", then.

One of the things I love most about the White Hen is that, when my wife or I go in to buy a newspaper, say, when we come back out to the car, we smell like hazelnut coffee!

MNW

That's it, Hawaii!

There is no White Hen in Japan. Around here are 7-11s and Japanese convenience store chains. I'd like to experience the hazelnut coffee!