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An Issue

Well, I usually try not to blog about international politics. So, this is gonna be one of the few such entries.

I'd be glad if you could take the time to read this page, and the ad (PDF) placed in the New York Times recently. Let me know if you have known about the matter and, if possible, what you think. Thanks.

This is what the Japanese in general are concerned about most about "the country" for now, tatroyer.

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Wow, had not hear about this at all over here in the US. ( I don't read the New York Times. ) It sounds like North Korea really likes to stir up trouble. When are they going to come to their senses are realize that Communism just doesn't work? Hopefully they will have the common decency to return all the abductees and their families.

Jeeze why hadn't I heard about this before? International news is so under reported in the US, it's as if the media believes we're the only country in the world. So is this well known in Japan?

That's actually a situation I've been kind of keeping up with. I try to avoid North American media as much as possible, most of all I avoid CNN. They have a habit of not telling the whole truth on any situation.
To be quite honest, North Korea has been confusing the heck out of me. For the life of me I can't figure out exactly what they're trying to accomplish. It's almost like they've been trying to cozy up with Japan by releasing the five Japanese nationals in the hopes of building some sort of trust with them. Perhaps it was their goal to make a friend with Japan because it had plans of angering the US and the UN in the near future (ie restarting their nuclear reactors and kicking out the UN Inspectors). But they've also managed to shoot themselves in the foot by not coming forth with further information about the other confirmed abductees.
Not to start a political debate, but I really don't know what to think in regards to North Korea. I don't blame them for restarting their reactors. I don't blame them for backing out of their deal with the US, as the US wasn't completely living up to their side of the bargain. But I do believe they are hiding things, but I'm unsure as to what ends. As far as the children of the returned nationals, of course they should be allowed to follow their parents to Japan -- especially if both parents of these families are there. If Korea does wish to become allies with Japan at some point, they are going to come forth with all the information regarding the abduction situation.

Sorry to spew forth so much about what I think about the whole situation. I think I've been blogging way to long.

I'm not quite clear on the sequence of events. At what point did the country of Japan find out where the missing people had gone? What did the government of Japan do at the time of the abductions, to try to rescue the hostages?

At first for the families of (the) abductees, it must have been like they woke up in the morning and found their family members had gone missing without any accountable reasons. I hear there was a rumor in those days that North Koreans might be kidnapping Japanese, and at some point, I guess, the families got to believe their loved ones were actually abducted by the North Koreans. The Japanese government hadn't done anything practical during those years, because there's no proof that "they" did it and Japan had, and has, no diplomatic relations with the country, thus no effective measures to take to dig into the case. Even so, I think the government had been quite irresponsible. The families and their supporters have been doing grass-root activities to find the facts for all those 20-something years and kept asking the government to take actions. It was quite an accident that the North Korean chairman admitted having abducted some Japanese nationals at the meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi.

I have to admit personally - though I have heard of the abductions before, I haven't had much interest in the matter. I feel shame.

For Japan, North Korea is near geographically, but so far away politically. I have no idea where the hell they are at, along with the nuke issue. The common decency doesn't seem to work there.

It's an awful situation! I can only imagine the devastation someone feels when a loved one disappears no matter what the reason.

Really an incredible story; I have been following it since North Korea first made the admission about the kidnappings. When I read that the victims of the kidnappings would be allowed to 'visit' Japan, but not to return permanently or to take their families, I was surprised -- how many international laws is North Korea breaking here? On the other hand, at so many other levels, the government of N. Korea seems to be acting in ways oblivious to world opinion.

That's right, Beth. And it seems the Japanese government has taken just a wait-and-see attitude so far. North Korea has also been provoking the US government. I don't get it.